Adams County

Adams County did not redistrict after the 2010 census. The population deviation is 22%, which is more than twice the allowable limit.  In addition, the districts are not compact with small non-contiguous pieces.  Thus, the Adams County Council disticts are illegally drawn.

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Bartholomew County

Bartholomew County is perhaps the worst example in the state of county council districts that are not compact or contiguous. Districts 1 and 2 have multiple pieces that are either completely non-contiguous or are connected only by a long, narrow road. In addition, four of its precincts are split between two districts.

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Benton County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgOur information for Benton County on our original website was in error.  Benton County redistricted in 2011 and now has a population deviation of only 8%.  [The reason for the error is that the state Elections Division apparently did not have the new list of precincts on file.  Our thanks to the Benton County clerk for bringing the error to our attention.]

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Blackford County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgThe primary problem with Blackford's county council districts is that the population deviation is 19%, twice the legally allowable limit.  In addition, two districts fail the compactness requirement, though that is because they follow Hartford City boundaries. 

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Boone County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgBoone County redistricted in 2011 and the disticts are reasonably compact. However, the population deviation of 15% still exceeds the allowable limit.

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Brown County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgBrown County apparently did not redistrict in 2011.  The population deviation is now 19%, nearly twice the allowable limit. The county needs to redistrict.

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Carroll County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgCarroll County's council districts are a model for the rest of the state. They are compact, contiguous and have a population deviation of only 5%, half the maxiumum allowable deviation of 10%.

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Cass County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgCass County apparently did not redistrict in 2011. The population deviation for its county council districts is twice the allowable limit. Thus the county needs to redistrict now.

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Clark County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgClark County's population deviation is only 6%, but three of the districts are not compact, with one district nearly bisecting another.

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Clay County

Clay County's council districts were out of compliance before the 2010 census, and the county failed to redistrict in 2011. The districts not compact and contiguous, and they have a population deviation of 30%--more than three times the allowable limit.

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Clinton County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgClinton County's council districts have a population deviation of only 4%. Though two of the districts have jagged boundaries because they follow city boundaries, they are otherwise compact. Thus Clinton is in compliance.

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Crawford County

Crawford County's council districts have the second worst population deviation in the state at 73%.  A vote cast in District 4 is, in effect, worth more than twice what a vote cast in District 2 is worth, thus depriving residents of District 2 of the right to equal representation in council decisions.

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Daviess County

Daviess County has a population deviation of 38%, nearly four times the allowable limit. In addition, one of the county council districts is in two pieces. Daviess County failed to redistrict in 2011.

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Dearborn County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgDearborn County's council districts pass the test. They have a population devation less than 10% and, with one small exception, are reasonably compact and contiguous.

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Decatur County

Decatur County did not redistrict in 2011. Although its county council districts are reasonably compact, the population deviation between the largest and smallest districts is an unacceptable 17%.

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DeKalb County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgAlthough DeKalb County appears to have redistricted in 2011, the population deviation is 15%, which is well above the maximum allowable deviation of 10%. Thus DeKalb's districts should be redrawn.

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Delaware County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgDelaware County redistricted in 2011, creating districts nearly equal in population with a deviation of only 2.1%. However, Districts 1 and 3 have non-contiguous pieces that lie wholly within other districts.

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Dubois County

Before redistricting in 2011, the population deviation for the Dubois county council was 32%. Upon redistricting, the county was able to bring the deviation down to 10%, which is probably allowable. District 2 is a bit jagged, but other than that, Dubois is in good shape.    

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Elkhart County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgElkhart redistricted in 2011. The current council districts are contiguous, reasonably compact and have a population of only 7%.

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Fayette County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgFayette County did not redistrict in 2011. The population deviation is now 26%, more than two-and-a-half times the allowable limit. 

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Floyd County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgFloyd County's districts have a population deviation of 45%, one of the worst in the state. The county did not redistrict in 2011 and needs to do so now.  

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Fountain County

Fountain County's council districts meet all requirements: they are compact and contiguous and have a population deviation of only 6%.  

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Franklin County

Franklin County's council districts are beautifully compact, but they have an unacceptably high population deviation of 17%. 

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Fulton County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgFulton County's council districts are only slightly above the acceptable population deviation (11% instead of 10%), and they are reasonably compact. 

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Grant County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgThe population deviation for Grant County is right at the upper limit of acceptability. The problem is that a major portion of one county council district is wholly inside of another district, thus failing the requirements that districts be compact and contiguous.  

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Greene County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgGreene County's council districts have a population deviation of 25%, two-and-a half times the allowable limit.  Though the districts are admirably compact, they need to be redrawn to ensure equal representation.  

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Hamilton County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgHamilton County's council districts are a model for other counties. Hamilton redistricted in 2011. Its districts are reasonably compact with a population deviation of only 7%.

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Hancock County

Hancock County redistricted in 2011, making major changes in district boundaries and bringing the population deviation down to an acceptable 7%. Unfortunately, District 2 is in two separate pieces and thus fails the requirement that districts be compact and contiguous.  

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Harrison County

Harrison County did an excellent job redistricting its county council in 2011. Previously, the population deviation was 33%, more than three times the allowable limit. After redistricting, the deviation was reduced to an acceptable 9%, while maintaining compact districts.

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Hendricks County

Hendricks County brought its population deviation down from 20% to only 7% by redistricting its county council in 2011. Unfortunately, it seems to have left parts of District 1 stranded inside of District 4 in violation of the requirement that districts be contiguous. 

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Henry County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgHenry County appears not to have redistricted in 2011 despite having a population deviation of 21%, twice the allowable limit.  When the county redistricts, the large state prison population (2,549) should be excluded.

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Howard County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgHoward County's council districts have a population deviation (14%) that is 40% higher than the allowable limit and the districts aren't entirely compact or contiguous. However, Howard County is not one of the worst offenders on any of these measures.

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Huntington County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgHuntington's county council districts have a population deviation of 18%, almost twice the allowable limit. One of the districts is also split in two by another district. Although the split is due to natural barriers, when the county redistricts they should be able to draw more compact districts.

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Jackson County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgAlthough Jackson County's council districts are slightly over the allowable limit (11% instead of less than 10%), they are reasonably compact. Overall, Jackson's districts are much better drawn than in most counties.

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Jasper County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgJasper County did an excellent job redistricting its county council in 2011, creating districts with deviations of less than 4%. Districts 1 and 2 have some anomalies with three small parcels of land, but otherwise, the districts are reasonably compact and contiguous.  

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Jay County

Jay County is a fine example of a county that was in violation after the 2000 census but did an excellent job of redistricting in 2011. The population deviation dropped from 31% to 5% and the districts are models of compactness.  

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Jefferson County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgJefferson County's council districts have a population deviation of 16%, which exceeds the maximum allowable deviation between the largest and smallest districts of 10%. In addition, District 3 cuts District 4 in half, thus also violating the requirement that all districts be contiguous.  

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Jennings County

Jennings County was already in violation of the requirements that districts be of nearly equal size and contiguous before the 2010 census. The county failed to redistrict in 2011 and its districts remain in violation. The population deviation is 26% and one district cuts another in half.

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Johnson County

Johnson County redistricted in 2011 and remedied some apparent earlier problems with non-contiguous pieces. However, the population deviation between the largest and smallest districts is an unacceptably high 24%. Johnson County needs to take another crack at redistricting.

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Knox County

Knox County did not redistrict in 2011 and now has a population deviation of 29%, almost three times the allowable limit.  By failing to provide equal representation for all county voters, it is in violation of Indiana law and the US Constitution.

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Kosciusko County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgKosciusko County did not redistrict in 2011 and now has a population deviation of 21%, more than twice the acceptable limit.  

 

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LaGrange County

Before LaGrange County redistricted in 2011, it had one of the highest population deviations in the state (41%).  The county did an excellent job of redistricting by creating county council districts that are compact, contiguous, and nearly equal in population, with a deviation of only 5%.  

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LaPorte County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgLaPorte County has two large state prisons with a total of 5,411 prisoners.  Both prisons are, according to the county clerk, in County Council District 3.  If the prisoners are not counted, then the population deviation for the county council is 30%.  If they are counted, it is a whopping 44%.  Either way, LaPorte needs to redistrict.

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Lawrence County

Lawrence County made sweeping changes to its districts in 2011. Unfortunately, the population deviation remains close to what it was before, 18% after redistricting compared to 21% before. Lawrence County should redistrict again, preferably making District 3 more compact in the process.

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Madison County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgMadison County redistricted in 2011 and its districts are contiguous and compact. However, it contains two prisons in one district. If the prisoners (who are disenfranchised and cannot vote) are counted as residents, the deviation is 7%. But if they're excluded, deviation is 13%.

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Marshall County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgMarshall County redistricted in 2011, with a population deviation of 10% and districts that are reasonably compact and contiguous.  Thus, Marshall is in compliance.  

 

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Martin County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgMartin County did not redistrict in 2011. Though its county council districts are reasonably compact and contain only whole precincts, it needs to redistrict to bring its 14% population deviation below 10%.

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Miami County

Miami County contains a large state prison with 3,174 inmates. Without counting the state's prisoners, the population deviation is an acceptable 10%.  However, Miami's council districts are not contiguous or compact. 

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Monroe County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgMonroe County did an excellent job of redistricting in 2011, creating reasonably compact districts with a population deviation of only 6%.

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Montgomery County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgMontgomery County did not need to redistrict its county council in 2011.  The districts were already reasonably compact and the population deviation is only 2%, the second lowest in the state.

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Morgan County

Morgan County redistricted in 2011 and brought the population deviation among county council districts down from at least 19% to only 6%.  The map that the commissioners settled on was not as compact as some that they considered but it complies with the law.

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Newton County

Newton County's commissioners apparently considered redistricting in 2011, but rejected the idea despite having one of the worst population deviations in the state (36%). The county will need to abandon reliance on township lines when new districts are drawn.

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Noble County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgNoble County's council districts fail two important tests: compactness and equal population. Not only is the population deviation 25% (two-and-a-half times the legal limit), but one of the districts also consists of two large pieces that meet only at one corner. Noble County definitely needs to redistrict.

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Ohio County

Ohio County has one oddly elongated district, but the real problem for the county is that the population deviation of its four county council districts is a whopping 35%.

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Orange County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgOrange County did not need to redistrict its county council in 2011 as the population deviation was less than 10% according to the new census, and the districts were reasonably compact.

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Owen County

The good news for Owen County is that the population deviation for its county councils is less than it used to be:  31% instead of 39%. The bad news is that it is still three times the legal limit. Owen County did not redistrict in 2011 and needs to do so now. 

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Parke County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgParke County did not redistrict in 2011, despite having a population deviation of 21%--twice the allowable limit.  State prisoners are 8% of Parke County's population, and about 25% of their current council district.  Thus when Parke redistricts, the county should exclude the prisoners.

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Perry County

Perry County's deviation is 70%, meaning residents in the smallest district have over twice as much say over council decisions as residents in the largest district. Perry contains a prison, and if prisoners were counted, the deviation would be 92%. They did not redistrict in 2011, and must do so now.

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Pike County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgPike County did not redistrict in 2011 and now has the 7th worst population deviation in the state: 40%, four times the allowable limit.

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Porter County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgAlthough Porter County redistricted its county council in 2011, and did an admirable job of making the districts more compact, the population deviation is an unacceptable 25%. Thus the districts need to be redrawn.

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Posey County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgPosey County did redistrict in 2011. Its four council districts are reasonably compact, but have a population deviation of 13%, just over the allowable maximum of 10%.

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Pulaski County

Tiny Pulaski County did not need to redistrict in 2011, as its districts were already compact and contiguous and the population deviation was only 5%.

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Putnam County

Putnam County had not redistricted in at least 40 years. After the 2000 census, the population deviation was a whopping 93%. But in 2011 the county redistricted and the current deviation is 10%--just barely compliant, but an enormous improvement. Its districts are compact and contiguous.

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Randolph County

Randolph County had a population deviation for its county council of 28% before the 2010 census and 32% now. It failed to redistrict in 2011. When it does redistrict it will probably have to create council districts that cross township lines, which they currently do not do.

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Ripley County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgRipley County has a population deviation of 15%. It appears not to have redistricted in 2011.

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Rush County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgRush County did not redistrict in 2011 and now has a population deviation of 18%, almost twice the allowable limit. Though one of the districts consists of two pieces, each wholly contained inside other districts, the northern piece is industrial and appears to contain no residents.

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Scott County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgScott County did not redistrict in 2011. Its council districts have a population deviation of 18%, nearly twice the allowable limit.  In addition, its districts are barely contiguous and not compact. Thus, Scott County needs to redistrict as soon as possible.

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Shelby County

Shelby County did not redistrict in 2011. Although the population deviation is only barely over the allowable limit, the main problem is that three of the districts are not compact and contiguos. That is in part due to the boundaries of the city of Shelbyville.

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Spencer County

Spencer County did an excellent job redistricting in 2011. Although its county council districts were not in compliance before the 2010 census, they are now.

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Starke County

Starke County did not redistrict in 2011, and its old districts had a deviation of 27%. They have a current deviation of 25%, as well as council districts following township lines, making for unequal populations. Starke County must redistrict.

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Steuben County

Steuben did not redistrict in 2011.  Its county council districts are compact, but they have a whopping 37% population deviation, nearly four times the allowable limit.  The county needs to redistrict as soon as possible.

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Sullivan County

Prior to 2011, Sullivan County had one of the highest population deviations in the state, 60%. They did redistrict, but still have a deviation of 28%. To make matters worse, 10% of the population is prisoners, over a third of District 3.

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Switzerland County

Tiny Switzerland County failed to redistrict in 2011.  It has a population deviation of 27% and one district that is not compact.  The county needs to redistrict to remedy both problems.

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Tippecanoe County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgTippecanoe County redistricted in 2011, but the estimated population deviation is three times the limit, 32%.  [Note: Our original report stated that Tippecanoe had two split precincts.  That information was incorrect.]

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Tipton County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgTipton County's council has one of the lowest population deviations in the state, 5%. Its districts are reasonably compact, with no shared precincts. The county had no need to redistrict in 2011 as its existing districts complied with all requirements.

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Union County

Union County had a deviation of about 50% before the 2010 Census, and failed to redistrict in 2011. They still have a population deviation of about 50%, the third worst in the state. 

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Vanderburgh County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgVanderburgh County Council districts have the lowest population deviation in the state, 1%, and are contiguous and reasonably compact. They are a model for the rest of the state.

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Vermillion County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgThe population deviation for Vermillion County Council districts is among the lowest in the state, only 4%.

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Vigo County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgVigo County apparently did not redistrict its county council in 2011, which is very suprising since the county was successfully sued in 1993 for failing to redistrict! 

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Wabash County

Wabash County redistricted in 2011, thus correcting a major problem with earlier redistricting in which one district completely bissected another. The population deviation is only 6%, one of the best in the state, and the districts are now reasonably compact and contiguous.

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Warren County

Prior to 2010, tiny Warren County had a population deviation of 25% for its county council districts.  The county did not redistrict after the 2010 census and the population deviation remains unacceptably high at 22%.

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Warrick County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgWarrick County apparently did not redistrict after the 2010 Census. Its county council districts have a population deviation of 13%, slightly over the 10% allowable limit and District 1 is not very compact. The county should be able to correct both problems fairly easily.

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Washington County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgWashington County appears not to have redistricted after the 2010 Census. It has a population deviation of 19%, nearly twice the allowable limit. When the county redistricts, it should try to correct the non-contiguous and non-compact division of Districts 2 and 4, caused by Precinct Salem 2.

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Wayne County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgWayne County violates just about every rule of redistricting. The county appears not to have redistricted after the 2010 Census; it splits precincts, which is specifically prohibited; its districts need to be more compact; and it has a population deviation that exceeds the maximum allowed.

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Wells County

Wells County did not redistrict after the 2010 Census, which is unfortunate, as the county council districts were already out of compllance. The current population deviation is 30%, three times the allowable limit. Wells County should redistrict now.

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White County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting White County.svgWhite County redistricted in 2011 and is now in compliance with state law.The 2000 districts, however, violated the requirement for approximately equal populations.

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Whitley County

130px-Map of Indiana highlighting Adams County.svgWhitley County did an excellent job of redistricting in 2011. Its districts are contiguous and reasonable compact and the population deviation is only 6%.

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AAAA:

In Compliance

This classification is to state that the county complies with redistricting requirements for local governments.

In Violation, Currently Redistricting

This classification is to state that the county is in violation of redistricting requirements for local governments, but that county officials are currently working to redistrict.

In Violation

This classification is to state that the county is in violation of redistricting requirements for local governments, and to our knowledge has not taken any steps to begin the redistricting process.